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This page displays information on the current status of Advanced Virgo. For information on the Open Public Alerts of the LIGO and Virgo global network of gravitational waves, please visit http://gracedb.ligo.org/latest/.

Sensitivity

Sensitivity curve

The sensitivity of the Advanced Virgo detector, as a function of the frequency (in the horizontal axis). Click here for more information

The sensitivity is given in terms of amplitude spectral density of the interferometer output noise expressed in units of gravitational wave strain. Thus the detector is more sensitive in the frequency range where the curve is lower. The blue curve represents the sensitivity at present, averaged over 300 sec: the exact start time is shown at the top of the figure. The green band shows the target performance for Advanced Virgo the present observation period, named 'O3'.

Interferometer Mode (last 24 hours)

ITF Mode

The percentage of time Advanced Virgo spent in its different possible status, during the 24h period shown at the top. Click here for more information

During the present observation period, named 'O3', the goal of Advanced Virgo is to stay in science mode (shown in green) as much as possible. However some maintanence work is necessary during the data taking and already planned, in coordination with the other detectors in the network: during these periods Advanced Virgo will change among different modes of operation. Environmental disturbances can also sometimes prevent us from recording science data.

BNS range (last 24 hours)

BNS range

The distance at which Advanced Virgo can observe the merger of a binary neutron star (BNS) system as a function of time. Click here for more information

The plotted quantity, called 'BNS range', is the distance at which the merger of a BNS system gives a matched filter signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 8 in Advanced Virgo with the current sensitivity; the distance is averaged over all the possible sky localisations and binary orientations. Each neutron star in the binary is assumed to have mass equal to 1.4 solar masses. The BNS range is given in units of megaparsecs (Mpc): a parsec is equal to 3.26 light-years. The stability of the range with respect to time reflects the stationarity of the detector; when Advanced Virgo is not locked then the range drops to zero (yellow shaded area).

BBH range (last 24 hours)

BBH range

The distance at which Advanced Virgo can observe the merger of a binary black hole (BBH) system as a function of time. Click here for more information

The plotted quantity, called 'BBH range', is the distance at which the merger of a BBH system gives a matched filter signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 8 in Advanced Virgo with the current sensitivity; the distance is averaged over all the possible sky localisations and binary orientations. Each black hole in the binary is assumed to have mass equal to 30 solar masses. The BBH range is given in units of megaparsecs (Mpc): a parsec is equal to 3.26 light-years. The stability of the range with respect to time reflects the stationarity of the detector; when Advanced Virgo is not locked then the range drops to zero (yellow shaded area).

More information on the status of Advanced Virgo and the global network of gravitational-wave detectors, which includes the two Advanced LIGO and GEO 600 interferometers, is available at: http://www.gw-openscience.org/detector_status/